Pinner Park Junior School: Equality Pinner Park Junior School: Equality
 Promoting British Values
Pinner Park Junior School: Equality
The Department for Education state that there is a need 'to create and enforce a clear and rigorous expectation on all schools to promote the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs.'

The government set out its definition of British values in the 2011 Prevent Strategy, and these values have been reiterated by the Prime Minister this year. At Pinner Park Junior School these values are reinforced regularly and in the following ways:

Democracy
Links to our: School Ethos, Learner for Life skills and Rights Respecting School Award:
Respect
Opportunity
Determination
Success
UNCRC Article 12: Children have the right to say what they think should happen, when adults are making decisions that affect them, and to have their opinions taken into account.
UNCRC Article 13: Every child must be free to say what they think and to seek and receive all kinds of information, as long as it is within the law.
  • As a Rights Respecting School — Level 2 — Children are taught about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and learn to respect their rights and the rights of others.
    • We have elected Rights Respecting Rangers.
    • Classes collaborate on their class charter of rights to respect, based on the UNCRC
    • Fund raising for link school in Masindi,Uganda — championing the rights of children across the world
    • Rights Respecting Day — compare & contrast UK & Uganda
  • We have an elected School Council. This is used as an opportunity to promote and teach about democracy and the electoral process
    • Pupil surveys — contributing to school improvement
    • Pupils organise and promote anti-bullying campaign
  • Curriculum links — specific units of work develop pupils' knowledge of a democratic society by contrasting with societies without such a system eg. Y6 Crime & Punishment unit; Y6 - Suffragettes; Literacy — Y4 Christoph's story; Enabling Enterprise — working as a group and making democratic decisions; WE day — voting for a local and global change.
  • We currently follow the Jigsaw Scheme as part of our PSHCE curriculum, in which the unit 'Being me in my world — understanding how democracy works; being part of a community and understanding consequences' & Celebrating Differences' encourages children to stand up for themselves and all those around them.
The rule of law
Links to our: School Ethos, Learner for Life skills and Rights Respecting School Award:
Respect
Opportunity
Determination
Success
UNCRC Article 16: Every child has the right to privacy. The law should protect the child's private, family and home life.
UNCRC Article 19: Governments should ensure that children are properly cared for, and protect them from violence, abuse and neglect by their parents, or anyone else who looks after them.
UNCRC Article 28: Discipline in schools must respect children's dignity.
UNCRC Article 40: A child accused or guilty of breaking the law must be treated with dignity and respect
The importance of Laws, whether they be those that govern the class, the school, or the country, are consistently reinforced throughout regular school days, as well as when dealing with behaviour and through school assemblies. Pupils are taught the value and reasons behind laws, that they govern and protect us, the responsibilities that this involves and the consequences when laws are broken.
  • We have high expectations about pupil conduct and this is reflected in our Behaviour Policy. Good behaviour and consistent demonstration of our values is recognised through rewards such as: Pinner Citizen points — Silver, Gold; weekly Gold certificates. Children, who do not follow our code of conduct, learn that actions lead to consequences and attend 'Time out' in the classroom or lunchtime 'Social Skills' where they are encouraged to reflect upon their choices made, the behaviour shown and impact on others.
  • PSHE Curriculum — Jigsaw 'Being me in my world' — being part of a community and understanding consequences — impact of bullying and disrespectful behaviour
  • Behaviour Policy is directly linked to Rights and children understand their rights are non-negotiable and what they need to do to ensure everyone's rights are respected.
  • Parents are informed of the UNCRC every year and a copy of the key rights and consequences of not respecting rights are shared on an annual basis
  • Whole school assemblies promote skills and knowledge of being a 'good citizen' with links to Rights — this also includes those actions that are against the law including discrimination, racism
  • The local police officer / PCSO regularly visit the school to talk to the children.
  • Peer mediators are trained in Y5 ready to commit to regular lunchtime commitment of supporting children in the playground
  • Attendance is a high priority and systems are in place to ensure children are accessing their right to a quality education.
  • Safeguarding is a actively promoted across the school —  up-to-date child protection policy and procedures including safer recruitment and reporting concerns; anti-bullying is actively promoted by both children and adults — we are a 'telling' school.
  • Pupils are taught how to make good choices when faced with issues such as peer pressure, through the Learner for Life programme and workshops such as Y6 Choices
Individual liberty
Links to our: School Ethos, Learner for Life skills and Rights Respecting School Award:
Respect
Opportunity
Determination
Success
UNCRC Article 15: Children have the right to meet together and to join groups and organisations, as long as this does not stop other people from enjoying their rights.
UNCRC Article 23: A child with a disability has the right to live a full and decent life with dignity and independence, and to play an active part in the community.
UNCRC Article 28: Every child has the right to an education. Primary education must be free. Discipline in schools must respect children's dignity.
UNCRC Article 29: Education must develop every child's personality, talents and abilities to the full.
UNCRC Article 31: All children have a right to relax and play, and to join in a wide range of activities.
Pupils are encouraged to know, understand and exercise their rights and personal freedoms and advised how to exercise these safely.
Through our school ethos and high quality provision, children are taught about personal responsibility, choices, ambition and aspiration. Pupils are actively encouraged to make choices, knowing that they are in a safe and supportive environment.
  • Choice of challenge in learning means that children are thinking more deeply about their decisions and are aspirational for themselves.
  • They are encouraged to take opportunities to follow their interests in art, music, sport etc.
  • They are also encouraged to take their roles and responsibilities as School Council members; Rights Respecting Rangers; Peer mediators; Y6 monitors; Sports Leaders, Sports Competition Committee members, and Peer Mediators.
  • We follow the Jigsaw Scheme as part of our PSHCE curriculum, in which the units 'Celebrating differences', 'Healthy Me', 'Relationships', 'Dreams & Goals' encourage children to plan and follow steps to individual success.
  • Children are taught how to keep themselves safe, including on-line. E-safety curriculum is taught at the beginning of each term to all pupils — age appropriate.
  • Children are taught about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and learn to respect their rights and the rights of others.
  • PE & Sport curriculum — Promotion of the concept of 'fair play', following and developing rules, inclusion, celebrating and rewarding success, being magnanimous in defeat and participation in activities that promote kinship and affiliation with others.
  • Cross curricular topics such as medieval crime & punishment; slave trade, suffragettes explores historical lack of rights and how personal liberty has changed over time in UK.
Mutual respect
Links to our: School Ethos, Learner for Life skills and Rights Respecting School Award:
Respect
Opportunity
Determination
Success
UNCRC Article 2: The Convention applies to everyone whatever their race, religion, abilities, whatever they think or say and whatever type of family they come from.
UNCRC Article 14: Every child has the right to think and believe what they want.
UNCRC Article 23: A child with a disability has the right to live a full and decent life with dignity and independence, and to play an active part in the community.
UNCRC Article 30: Children have a right to learn and use the language and customs of their families, whether these are shared by the majority of people in the country or not.
As a Rights Respecting Level 2 school mutual respect is an embedded part of school life. Every opportunity is taken to support children understanding their rights and how we can ensure this is the same for us all including our friends in Masindi, Uganda.
  • Children are taught about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and learn to respect their rights and the rights of others.
  • Class Charters reinforce the fact that every child has these rights and that they should be respected
  • Through our school ethos, Rights Respecting and our SMSC policy, children are taught how to earn trust and respect and are encouraged to develop a strong sense of morality; knowing right from wrong and choosing to do the right thing even when it's difficult and the impact of their actions - we are a school that 'talks it out to sort it out'.
  • Our PSHCE curriculum includes units of work that promote safeguarding pupils through understanding how to be a good friend; similarities & differences; coping with peer pressure; personal safety safety (including online); developing confidence in self-esteem and ability to speak out/ up. Units such as 'Celebrating Differences' and 'Relationships' encourage children to celebrate their own and the beliefs and cultures of others too.
  • Our PSHCE and Computing Curriculum include regular units of work on e-safety, both in keeping safe online and showing respect for others.
  • The school recently achieved the Inclusion Quality Mark (IQM) which validates the inclusive nature of the school where equitable opportunities are promoted and enjoyed by all pupils.
  • We are a Visible Learning school — seeing learning through pupil's eyes — feedback is used by pupils and staff to support children in developing and enjoying their learning.
Tolerance of different faiths and beliefs
Links to our: School Ethos, Learner for Life skills and Rights Respecting School Award:
Respect
Opportunity
Determination
Success
UNCRC Article 14: Children have the right to think and believe what they want, and to practise their religion, as long as they are not stopping other people from enjoying their rights. Parents should guide their children on these matters.
UNCRC Article 30: Every child has the right to learn and use the language, customs and religion of their family, regardless of whether these are shared by the majority of the people in the country where they live.
Our value of respect for all ensures tolerance of those who have different faiths and beliefs. This is achieved through enhancing pupils understanding of their place in a culturally diverse society and by giving them opportunities to experience such diversity.
  • We have high expectations about pupil conduct and this is reflected in our Behaviour and Equal Opportunities Policies.
  • Tolerance of different faiths and beliefs is promoted through the Locally Agreed (SACRE) Syllabus for Religious Education. Children learn about different religions, their beliefs, places of worship and festivals. Displays can be seen periodically around the school sharing children's knowledge of different faiths and beliefs including Christianity.
  • When appropriate, class, phase and whole school assemblies, mark and celebrate significant religious festivals such as Ramadan, Diwali and the Chinese New Year.
  • Visits are made and assemblies delivered, by local religious leaders. School community adults share the foods and traditions of their cultures periodically to link with topics being studied or community events such as PTA Summer fair; Navrati dancing. Classes visit places of worship in the community.
  • Children are taught about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and learn to respect their rights and the rights of others.
  • Assemblies and RE days celebrate the differences in our school community and show respect for them, giving pupils and staff an opportunity to share their beliefs and cultural identity.
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